CCC Quick Info

What do I say about the CCC if I only have 2 minutes?

The Canadian Council of Churches identifies itself as a non-profit organization of Christian ‘unity in diversity.’

The Canadian Council of Churches was formed in 1944 because 10 denominations believed that the faithful way to witness to Jesus Christ in Canada was to do so in relationship with one another.

Over 65 years later, we are 25 denominations from the Anglican, Evangelical, Catholic, Historic Reform, Free Church, and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox traditions, representing in those 25 denominations 85% of the Christians in Canada.

Our mission and witness are primarily carried out in the work of the Justice and Peace Commission and the Faith and Witness Commission and their sub-committees. Some current issues include: anti-racism, human trafficking, nuclear weapons, Afghanistan, poverty, the importance and use of doctrine, emergency planning, the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, InterFaith relationships, Christian theological reflection on suffering and hope, theological reflection on biotechnology, the Millennium Development Goals and the lack of progress towards their fulfillment, and, most recently, the churches’ responses to the platforms of the federal election.

Together we dialogue, witness and work in common action. In unity and in celebration of the richness of diversity, CCC denominations write letters to and meet with our government leaders, engage the media and publish resources on some of the challenges in faithful living in the 21st century. Our resources are available in hard copy and in downloadable form on our website (www.councilofchurches.ca). All our materials are available in English and French.

We are constantly working together to embody ecumenical, Christian ‘unity in diversity.’

What do I say about the CCC if I have 5 minutes?

The Canadian Council of Churches identifies itself as a non-profit organization of Christian ‘unity in diversity.’

The Council was formed in 1944 because 10 denominations believed that the faithful way to witness to Jesus Christ in Canada was to do so in relationship with one another.

Over 65 years later, we are 25 denominations from the Anglican, Evangelical, Catholic, Historic Reform, Free Church, and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox traditions, representing in those 25 denominations 85% of the Christians in Canada.

The denominations of the CCC work together in a consensus model we call Forum, where the voice of every denomination around the table matters.

What is asked of a member denomination is the following:
1) they must be Trinitarian;
2) they must commit themselves to some financial support of the CCC;
3) they must commit themselves to involvement in the work of the CCC, including the Governing Board (primary decision-making level);

We encourage denominations in their self-definition and expression. For example, in prayer and worship, which is not an ‘ecumenical’ or blended worship form but rather a joining each other in prayer according to the tradition of the worship space we are in or the tradition of the presider.

We share in the centrality of our belief in Jesus Christ but in many other areas of tradition we differ from one another. We do not try and erase those differences but listen to each other with respect.

When engaging in a particular concern or statement we work within our consensus model, striving as much as possible to reach a consensus in word and deed. In recent years we have accomplished this goal often, but when it is not possible to reach a consensus denominations have the choice of whether they will sign on to a statement or initiative or not. If there is not a full ‘sign on’ then the work is not promoted as a CCC matter but rather as one undertaken by a number of denominations.

Our mission and witness are primarily carried out in the work of the Justice and Peace Commission and the Faith and Witness Commission and their sub-committees. Some current issues include: anti-racism, human trafficking, nuclear weapons, Afghanistan, poverty, the importance and use of doctrine, emergency planning, the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, InterFaith relationships, Christian theological reflection on suffering and hope, theological reflection on biotechnology, the Millennium Development Goals and the lack of progress towards their fulfillment, and, most recently, the churches’ responses to the platforms of the federal election.

Together we dialogue, witness and work in common action. In unity and in celebration of the richness of diversity, CCC denominations write letters to our government leaders and engage the media in order to speak with one voice regarding issues of justice and peace; we pray and encourage Canadians to pray with us at public services; and we publish resources together on some of the challenges in faithful living in the 21st century. Our resources are available in hard copy and in downloadable form on our website (www.councilofchurches.ca). All our materials are available in English and French.

We are constantly working together to embody ecumenical, Christian ‘unity in diversity.’

The Canadian Council of Churches - Le Conseil Canadien Des Églises

47 Queen's Park Crescent East
Toronto, ON
M5S 2C3

www.councilofchurches.ca

T: 416.972.9494
F: 416.927.0405
TF: 1.866.822.7645

info@councilofchurches.ca

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